Swing Axle to IRS conversion

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strokin:




heres the hole in the tunnel, and the jig. 
the bracket sits inside the tunnel a skosh

Atomwerk Engineering:
Our company has been working on a bolt unit that allows for adjustment to camber as driver sees fit. It is a replacement for stock axles and will not devalue a classic. Hope to have it available for production soon. I say, why hack a classic if it is not necessary?

www.atomwerk.org

Kimbo:
The only comment I can make on this is more a word of caution than anything else. My tube frame race buggy, was originally based on a swing axle rear end, and 2 PO's before me modified it to run IRS in pretty much the same manner as VIN describes, i.e. with the hole cut in the horns to "accomodate" the inner edges of the pivot boxes. This setup has worked very successfully for many years - HOWEVER, when I purchased the buggy I did notice notice some small cracks in the horns around where the pivot boxes were located. Last year during an engine swap I decided to finally attack/address these cracks and get them fixed once and for all.

The issue, turns out, was not cracks in the horns themselves (thankfully), but cracks around the welds that essentially joined the pivot boxes to the horns. We ended up plating the complete top of the horns and over the tops of the pivot boxes to spread the load - they haven't reappeared - yet.

I run a water cooled engine, which has fixed engine mounts, so the weight of the trans and engine is not just hung off the horns, it's spread around the frame. I'm not saying that there's any problems with the method described, and it's used commonly here in Aus, but, you are cutting a hole into an area that supports a fair amount of weight, and are therefore potentially weakening it.

So, if you're going to take this approach, ensure your welding skills are up to scratch (a bird poo blobby approach like mine, is definitely NOT recommended for this area) or get a pro welder to do it for you. And, depending on the amount of heavy offroad use, you may need to check that area for stress fractures more frequently than you would if were used for just blacktop work.


Cheers ... Kimbo

strokin:
Quote from: Atomwerk Engineering on March 03, 2011, 09:25:58 AM

Our company has been working on a bolt unit that allows for adjustment to camber as driver sees fit. It is a replacement for stock axles and will not devalue a classic. Hope to have it available for production soon. I say, why hack a classic if it is not necessary?

www.atomwerk.org



cant wait to see the actual parts!   good to see more American companys producing what looks like to be quality parts.  the Chinese crap is getting a little old

Atomwerk Engineering:
Quote from: VIN on March 03, 2011, 11:44:30 AM

Quote from: Atomwerk Engineering on March 03, 2011, 09:25:58 AM

Our company has been working on a bolt unit that allows for adjustment to camber as driver sees fit. It is a replacement for stock axles and will not devalue a classic. Hope to have it available for production soon. I say, why hack a classic if it is not necessary?

www.atomwerk.org



cant wait to see the actual parts!   good to see more American companys producing what looks like to be quality parts.  the Chinese crap is getting a little old



Thank you for the encouragement. I too am tired of the Chinese crap that only ruins our cars. These companies appear to have no quality control so often times the products are junk even before you can put them on. I have the prototype to a fully adjustable camber unit in my garage and I have about 10 years of engineering into it. I cannot disclose the details about it due to patent issues, but suffice to say it does work well. When I am finished I will be able to sell an entire suspension that has been custom engineered to get the most performance out of our beloved swing axles without having to hack and devalue them. I have designed an entire suspension for swing axles that may just surpass the mighty IRS.

While I am not able to offer the entire project yet, I have just completed my Drop Plates and Raise Plates for the short torsion bar (21 3/4) swing axle suspension and they work fantastic! I could talk about the technical reasons why they work so well all day, but that cannot convey how good it feels just to drive it over many types of roads and know that the car is lowered! You cannot tell that from inside the car when you are driving it.

I have an adjustable ride height version hub that is soon to be available and bolts directly to these plates.

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